Saturday, February 17, 2018

Kubernetes: A start





Kubernetes is an open-source platform for managing containerized workloads and services, that facilitates both declarative configuration and automation.

Kubernetes builds upon a decade and a half of experience at Google running production workloads at scale using a system called Borg, combined with best-of-breed ideas and practices from the community.

Kubernetes has a number of features. It can be thought of as:

  • a container platform
  • a microservices platform
  • a portable cloud platform and a lot more

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Kubernetes provides a container-centric management environment. It orchestrates computing, networking, and storage infrastructure on behalf of user workloads. This provides much of the simplicity of Platform as a Service (PaaS) with the flexibility of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and enables portability across infrastructure providers.

Kubernetes is not a traditional, all-inclusive PaaS (Platform as a Service) system. Since Kubernetes operates at the container level rather than at the hardware level, it provides some generally applicable features common to PaaS offerings, such as deployment, scaling, load balancing, logging, and monitoring.
  • Does not limit the types of applications supported. Kubernetes aims to support an extremely diverse variety of workloads, including stateless, stateful, and data-processing workloads. If an application can run in a container, it should run great on Kubernetes.
  • Does not deploy source code and does not build your application. 
  • Does not provide application-level services, such as middleware (e.g., message buses), data-processing frameworks (for example, Spark), databases (e.g., mysql), caches, nor cluster storage systems (e.g., Ceph) as built-in services. Such components can run on Kubernetes, and/or can be accessed by applications running on Kubernetes through portable mechanisms, such as the Open Service Broker.
  • Does not provide nor adopt any comprehensive machine configuration, maintenance, management, or self-healing systems.


With Kubernetes you can:

  • Orchestrate containers across multiple hosts.
  • Make better use of hardware to maximize resources needed to run your enterprise apps.
  • Control and automate application deployments and updates.
  • Mount and add storage to run stateful apps.
  • Scale containerized applications and their resources on the fly.
  • Declaratively manage services, which guarantees the deployed applications are always running how you deployed them.
  • Health-check and self-heal your apps with autoplacement, autorestart, autoreplication, and autoscaling.




Let's break down some of the more common terms to help you understand Kubernetes.

Master: The machine that controls Kubernetes nodes. This is where all task assignments originate.

Node: These machines perform the requested, assigned tasks. The Kubernetes master controls them.

Pod: A group of one or more containers deployed to a single node. All containers in a pod share an IP address, IPC, hostname, and other resources. Pods abstract network and storage away from the underlying container. This lets you move containers around the cluster more easily.

Replication controller:  This controls how many identical copies of a pod should be running somewhere on the cluster.

Service: This decouples work definitions from the pods. Kubernetes service proxies automatically get service requests to the right pod—no matter where it moves to in the cluster or even if it’s been replaced.

Kubelet: This service runs on nodes and reads the container manifests and ensures the defined containers are started and running.

kubectl: This is the command line configuration tool for Kubernetes.

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